A Sense of Awe: Reflecting on the poetry and work of Jacqueline Suskin

Jacqueline Siskin states that “Awe” lies at the heart of poetry. Awe allows us to see what matters in the world. It helps us find the joy, the sorrow, and the connections that can lead to individual and collective healing.

Haiku: The Sacred Art by Margaret D. McGee

“I didn’t know it, but I was having a 'haiku moment’- a moment when the mind stops and the heart moves”.  This quote is from Margaret McGee, the author of  Haiku: The Sacred Art (A Spiritual Practice in Three Lines), and it marks the beginning of her journey toward a haiku life.

The Heart of Haiku by Jane Hirshfield

The Heart of Haiku is a short book written by Jane Hirshfield in which she investigates the evolution of Matsuo Basho’s writing and poetry. Using Basho’s own words and haiku, Hirschfield demonstrates Basho's impact on the poetic world.  

Basho, The Narrow Road, and Haibun

The Narrow Road to the Deep North is Basho’s third book documenting his travels in Japan, and it is considered one of the major Japanese texts from the Edo period. This book, written in haibun, demonstrates Basho’s mastery of this form. Yuasa states that the “prose and haiku illuminate each other like two mirrors held up facing each other.”

Favorite Books of 2021 and Readers’ Poll

As we move towards the end of the year, I wanted to spend a bit of time reflecting on my favorite books and provide an opportunity to hear about your favorites. Below are four of my favorite books, and an opportunity for you to help create the 1st Annual Naturalist Weekly Readers’ Book List.

The Sense of Wonder

The reasons for wanting to pass down knowledge can be various, but what remains the same is the underlying hope that others can benefit from your experiences. Today we have two books from accomplished authors that contribute to creating a sense of wonder in the natural world.

Visualizing Nature: Essays on Truth, Spirit, and Philosophy

Visualizing Nature: Essays on Truth, Spirit, and Philosophy, is edited by Stuart Kestenbaum. In this book, Kestenbaum asked the essayist “How does nature speak to you? And how do you listen to nature?’ Each essayist responded in their own way harnessing their personal experience and expertise to share stories about forests, deserts, coral reefs, and shorelines.

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