The European Columbine

The European, or Garden, Columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris) is a perennial plant with blue, purple, or white flowers.  Each flower is about as long as it is wide.  This plant, which is a member of the Buttercup family, will grow up to 3 feet tall.(1) The European Columbine has spread widely across North Americas and is... Continue Reading →

Folklore of Butterflies

Have you ever sat down and watched a butterfly in flight?  It is a truly magical experience. A butterfly will flap its wings and glide through the air until it finds an outstretched branch or flower to land on.  Gently, the butterfly sits on the branch. Slowly, it moves its wings back and forth until... Continue Reading →

Hummingbirds as Pollinators

Hummingbird at our feeder - June 09, 2021 My research this week have been focused on pollinators species and pollinator gardens. Hummingbirds, as it turns out, are also a vital part of the pollinator population. There are approximately 328 different species(1) of these amazing little birds, which are a part of the larger order of... Continue Reading →

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail in haiku

Earlier this week I posted about Honeysuckles and the importance of pollinator gardens. In that post, I wrote a haiku that mentioned the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus).  Well, as it turns out the Monarch butterfly might have been a perfect fit for my haiku, but it wasn't what I was seeing.  I was actually watching... Continue Reading →

Lilacs

Lilacs, besides being truly beautiful plants to look at, have their roots firmly planted in human history through poetry and literature. 

Chokecherry

As the flowers from the Pin Cherry tree drop away, the white flowers of the Chokecherry emerge to take their place on the landscape. The woody plant known as Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) grows as a shrub or small tree under 30 feet in height. It often grows in dense thickets and in damp, rich soils. ... Continue Reading →

Sit Spot Haiku – Apple blossom

An apple tree bloomsOn a forgotten road Time has passed us by It is said that New England established its first cultivated apple orchard in 1623. The location of the orchard was Beacon Hill in Massachusetts. The apple that was grown was called The Baldwin. Apple trees soon became a staple of the New England... Continue Reading →

Dryad’s Saddle

This beautiful bracket mushroom's scientific name is Polyporus squamosus. It's common name is Dryad's Saddle.  These polyporus fungus can either grow on fallen logs and tree stumps in a saprophytic relationship, or may be found as a parasitic growth on hardwood trees such as maple and elm. They have widespread distribution including being found in... Continue Reading →

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